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Russell Brand just eviscerates modern political systems on BBC

If you were to tell me that I’d be watching a video of comedian Russell Brand discussing modern politics and finding myself agreeing with him wholesale, I’d probably call you crazy. Brand’s usual comedic methods tend to fall outside of my wheelhouse and into the realm of absurdity, although I will say that Forgetting Sarah Marshall and Get Him to the Greek were marvelous performances. Anyway, this isn’t about his comedy or work that he does in television.

Celebrities end up being given amazing amounts of power and a giant platform to express opinions, which is really quite ironic when you think about it, as they are usually entertainers. Most of them end up going down a route that we’d like to call pretentious, often times very political and leaning to one spectrum or the other. While it can be an admirable thing, it is a bit draining and derivative at times, making it come across as a whole lot less sincere than they probably intend for it to be.

So here is Russell Brand, this wacky, unkempt British comedian and actor being interviewed on BBC about his work editing a political magazine and he just completely lays out what is wrong with the world today. I mean, it is astonishing, eloquent and beautiful. In theory, what Brand talks about is just amazing and well above his pay grade. I’m not sure that I subscribe to pushing for truly socialist ideals, but his stance on not voting because it shows complacency with a broken system and the distribution of wealth being skewed is really spot on.

Just watch as he handles himself quite well, as one minute he’s asked serious questions and the next he’s written off as flippant and irrelevant.

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